Sunday, 22 October, 2017

Oxford moots city centre petrol and diesel ban from 2020

Proposals will almost halve nitrogen dioxide pollution by 2020 on some of Oxford’s most polluted roads Proposals will almost halve nitrogen dioxide pollution by 2020 on some of Oxford’s most polluted roadsAlamy
Juana Turner | 14 October, 2017, 00:50

Today's proposal is a start, both for Oxford and other cities around the world to launch their own bans on petrol vehicles.

The government has already announced its plans for all conventional petrol and diesel new cars to be banned from 2040, meaning new vehicles would have to be hybrid or fully-electric.

But during this time heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) and buses will likely be excluded from the ban (or, in the case of buses, diverted around the zone) given that electric vehicles to replace them won't exist by 2020.

The ban will reduce nitrogen dioxide levels in the city's worst pollution blackspot, George Street, by 74%, returning it to natural levels of pollution.

The City and County Council will be holding a six-week consultation period with the public and businesses on how the plans will be implemented.

The proposals would see the ban being rolled out slowly, starting with all petrol and diesel cars, taxis and buses being excluded from six streets in 2020.

None of this is to say that Oxford's intention to create a zero-emissions zone isn't well-intentioned.

The City Council recognises the need for further funding to install EV charging infrastructure in the city.

From 2030, non-zero emission taxis, cars, light commercial vehicles and buses would be excluded from all roads within Hollybush Row, Hythe Bridge Street, Worcester Street, Beaumont Street, St Giles', part of Parks Road, South Parks Road, St Cross Road, Longwall Street, Merton Street, Blue Boar Street, St Aldate's and Thames Street. The City Council wrote to the Government in June to ask for more funding and powers to tackle air pollution in Oxford.

Councillor John Tanner of Oxford city council expressed the city's endorsement of this eco-friendly change: "Toxic and illegal air pollution in the city centre is damaging the health of Oxford's residents..."

Does the Zero Emissions Zone make sense for Oxford city centre?

“Everyone needs to do their bit – from national government and local authorities to businesses and residents – to end this public health emergency.”.

"All of us who drive or use petrol or diesel vehicles through Oxford are contributing to the city's toxic air". Traditionally, though, Oxford is an environmentally aware city, so the proposal is expected to face less opposition than the capital's upcoming T-Charge.

Recommended

5 reasons James Franklin isn't a good fit for the Aggies 5 reasons James Franklin isn't a good fit for the Aggies Franklin agreed to a three-year, $19.75 million extension in August that runs through the 2022 season. He's an attractive candidate for the Aggies, who'd have to pay Penn State a modest $2 million buyout.

Google adds Chromecast control to Assistant on smartphones Google adds Chromecast control to Assistant on smartphones In other cases, including if only one person is on ViLTE, Google Duo is used to connect the video call to other Google Duo users. When the Google Assistant was officially announced, many looked at it as a beefed up and more personal version of Google Now.

Samsung Electronics CEO Announces Surprise Resignation Samsung Electronics CEO Announces Surprise Resignation Kwon first joined Samsung back in 1985 as a researcher of the company's Semiconductor Research Institute in the US. The CEO expressed hope that his retirement will become an opportunity for Samsung to take the next step forward.