Wednesday, 13 December, 2017

Mo Farah Takes on the London Track One Last Time

Mo Farah will retire from track racing at the end of the 2017 season.                  Reuters  Henry Browne Mo Farah will retire from track racing at the end of the 2017 season. Reuters Henry Browne
Spencer Simpson | 07 August, 2017, 00:49

BBC commentators Steve Cram and Brendan Foster believe the win - Farah's 10th global title - required the finest display of his career and Farah, who has now won six world titles over the two distances, said he "definitely agreed with them".

That he claimed it in the season's fastest time of 26:49.51 seconds was a testament to his experience.

Best ever: Mo Farah wins his 10th consecutive gold medal.

Since missing out on gold by a hair's breadth in Daegu in 2011 after Ibrahim Jeilan unleashed one of the greatest ever final laps, Farah has won world doubles in 2013 and 2015 and Olympic doubles in 2012 and 2016.

Farah whose final major track race will be the 5,000m with the heat on Wednesday described the 10,000m as the "difficult race" in his career.

Heading into the 2017 IAAF World Championships starting on Friday, the gold medal is Farah's to lose.

Canada's Mohammed Ahmed, who competes for Portland's Bowerman Track Club, took eighth in a national record 27:02.35 and US champion Hassan Mead of the Oregon Track Club Elite in Eugene placed 15th in 27:32.49, a personal best.

It takes something to upstage Usain Bolt in an Olympic Stadium.

He was twice tripped in a pulsating final lap before recovering to win his 10th global title in 26:49.53, ahead of Joshua Kiprui Cheptegei. I have to get this start together because I can't keep doing this.

In one of the most competitive events at these championships, British record holder Muir ran a controlled race to come through her heat, with both Judd and McDonald producing personal bests as the big medal contenders - Faith Kipyegon, Caster Semenya and Genzebe Dibaba - underlined their threat.

"I did my training in Kapchorwa, Uganda and didn't go to Kaptagat in Kenya because I saw the conditions are nearly the same".

So, of his rivals in Friday's 10,000m, who can get close to Farah, who again is not the quickest in the field going into the championships?

"It was just bad", said the 22-year-old.

"I've known him personally since he was small, so it's been tough to watch", Merry, a bronze medal victor in the 400 metre race at the 2000 Olympic Games, told us.

The Kenyans resumed their control up front soon afterwards and upped the pace recording a lap of 61 seconds with the Ugandans tucked in behind them and Farah 11th.

Neil Black, Farah's team boss, told The Mirror fans could expect to see "something pretty special" from Farah.

Farah hung on during a relentless race which began at a blistering pace with Kenya's Geoffrey Kamworor and Tanui and Uganda's Cheptegei and Timothy Toroitich putting the pressure on at the front.

"I knew with 12 laps to go when they went hard from there, I knew it was going to be tough", Farah said. I've got such a long stride I got caught twice and at that point I was just trying to stand up. After all, he fell at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics and still won.

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